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FireAngel Blog

Are Smoke Alarms Meant To Connect?

Different ways smoke alarms can connect Mains and battery powered smoke and heat alarms can interlink in a number of ways: they can be hardwired, wireless (e.g. connected via Smart RF wireless technology) or part of a mixed system (also known as hybrid system). The simplest and quickest way to connect/interlink alarms is via wireless radio-frequency as this requires no destructive hardwired cabling. Not only does this reduce installation time, but it allows up to 50 Smart RF alarms to be easily installed (or uninstalled) into the same meshed network.
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How To 'Learn In' Smoke Alarms To Create An Enhanced Fire Safety Network

What is the 'Learn in' process to interlink alarms ? The process of 'learning in' is a simple and intelligent way of wirelessly interlinking up to 50 different Wi-Safe 2 fire safety devices in a property. Interlinking alarms is highly beneficial to residents as, when one alarm detects a problem, all the smoke/heat/ carbon monoxide (CO) alarms within the wireless network will sound. Not only with this alert occupants (regardless of where they are in the home) but for Wi-Safe 2 products, this will also exemplify the type of problem.
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What Is FireAngel Multi-Sensor Technology?

What is Multi-Sensor technology? As technology advances, fire safety is becoming increasingly advanced, readily available, and affordable. At the forefront of this is Multi Sensor technology - whereby smoke alarm units are monitoring for more than one indication of fire - hence giving a quicker, more reliable, and faster reaction in the event of fire.
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7 Benefits Of The Stove Guard - An Automatic Stove Shut Off Device

Did you know that over 60% of home fires start in the kitchen? Given the presence of flammable oils, heat sources and variety of electrical appliances - this is understandable. Yet it doesn’t mean landlords and residents can’t take several steps to enhance their level of safety in the home, especially when there are vulnerable people living there. Fire prevention methods in the kitchen can be both behavioural and technological. For instance, installing fire alarms including smoke and heat alarms, not leaving cooking unattended, and practising an escape plan are some of the procedures outlined in our Fire Safety In The Kitchen eBook. However, for tenants who are high risk or vulnerable - such as children, the elderly, disabled or those living with dementia - a higher level of fire protection may be required.
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Make Sure Your Smoke Alarms Are Meeting British Standards

Smoke alarm ownership has risen from just 8% of the UK population in 1988, to approximately 92% in 2014/15 - a key influence in the decreasing number of fire incidents attended by the fire and rescue service (FRS).  However, it is important to note that only working alarms can save lives. It is therefore fundamental that alarms are installed correctly, and regularly checked.
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Social Housing Toolkit 

Whether you are a registered social housing provider, or are involved in the specification, procurement or general maintenance of social housing, there are a variety of useful online fire safety resources that can be referred to throughout your management process. In this ‘social housing toolkit’, we’ll show you some of the best links to use when working within this field. These include relevant legislation and regulation, British Standards, useful fire and rescue services (FRS) links, and GOV resources.
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SONA by FireAngel: A Step By Step Alarm Installation Guide

When installing a fire alarm, there are many factors to consider. Broadly speaking, this includes considering the UK fire safety standards and regulations, but it also involves thinking of the design of the building, the risk of fire, and the needs of the tenant.
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The Different Types Of Fire Alarms And Where To Install Them

Selecting and installing smoke alarms correctly - and making sure they are in working order - is a crucial role for housing providers and M&E contractors, together providing the best protective standard possible for tenants. This comes down to fitting a suitable alarm in an appropriate location, and ensuring compliance with legislation and recommended best practice. For instance, under the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm (England) Regulations 2015, private landlords are required to have at least one smoke alarm installed on each storey of their properties, and a CO alarm in any room containing a solid fuel burning appliance (e.g. a coal fire, wood burning stove).
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Interlink Fire Alarms – What’s The Connection?

Standalone alarms are quite limited in the surrounding areas that they can detect, and the distance their sound can travel. As a result, tenants may not always hear the alarm unless they’re close by. This is a cause for concern, especially in light of a recent BBC News study which found that a staggering 27 out of 34 children will sleep through smoke detector alarms.
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